Schooling System In Japan

Advertisements
 





 

Education in Japan is very structured, with most students attending public or private elementary schools from the ages of 6 to

 

 

Answer: Japan is renowned for its high-quality education system. Schools in Japan use an interesting and unique approach that gives children the opportunity to develop their intellectual and social skills and prepares them for life outside of the classroom. In this guide, we’ll discuss everything you need to know about schooling in Japan, including the different levels available, the various types of schools, and what countries are recognized by Japanese institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
 





Advertisements
 





Schooling System In Japan

 

 

 

 

 

Schooling in Japan is considered to be of a high standard and has several distinctive educational features. Japan’s nation-wide education system comprises six years of elementary school, three years of lower secondary school and three years of upper secondary school, for which attendance is compulsory for all Japanese citizens. Education policy since the late 19th century has emphasized the importance of developing both intellectual and moral character.

 

 

 

Elementary education typically lasts from April in the year a child turns 6 until they reach 12 and attend lower secondary school. At this point, students are taught different subjects like mathematics, science, japanese language, social studies, physical education. After completing several years of elementary education, students must pass rigorous tests to get into their chosen high schools or universities before advancement to any aforementioned institution can occur. For those that prefer not to go directly on to college after graduating high school have the option of attending vocational training schools instead where they can gain specific skills that relate to their future career paths.

 

 

 

Upon graduating from upper secondary school (third grade), some students may elect to pursue university-level higher education though others may choose vocational/technical schools instead. There are five types of universities that offer undergraduate programs throughout Japan: national universities; private universities; public open universities; junior colleges, which offer two-year programs; and special training colleges for specific fields, such as hotel management.

 

 

 

At each stage in the schooling system throughout Japan deviations from normal course work are possible by taking either an entrance examination or by participating in eikaiwa (English conversation) courses offered at High Schools throughout the country. Students who take advantage these opportunities can study more than one foreign language at once – such as English  – or even focus on some area related to their intended profession like economics or international business law before taking a final exam in order to gain graduation requirements.

 

 

テキストのコピーはできません。